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Forwarded by Margie Maes

———- Forwarded message ———- From: Joffrion, Elizabeth <EJoffrion@neh.gov> Date: Tue, Feb 23, 2010 at 3:08 PM Subject: [Digipres] NEH Preservation Assistance Grants to Smaller Institutions To: digipres@ala.org

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES

DIVISION OF PRESERVATION AND ACCESS

Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions help small and mid-sized institutions, such as libraries, museums, historical societies, archival repositories, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities, improve their ability to preserve and care for their humanities collections.  Awards of up to $6000 support preservation related collection assessments, consultations, training and workshops, and institutional and collaborative disaster and emergency planning. Grants cover consultant fees, workshop registration fees, related travel and per diem expenses, and the costs of purchasing and shipping preservation supplies and equipment.

NEH has recently expanded of the kind of training that Preservation Assistance Grants supports.  In addition to general preservation workshops, these grants will support education and training in digital best practices and the management and preservation of digital resources.

All applications to the NEH must be submitted through Grants.gov. See the application guidelines for details.

The 2010 guidelines for Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions are available at http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/pag.html. You will also find sample project descriptions, sample narratives, and a list of frequently asked questions. The deadline for applications is May 18, 2010.

U.S. nonprofit organizations are eligible, as are state and local governmental agencies and tribal governments. Individuals are not eligible to apply.

Small and mid-sized institutions that have never received an NEH grant are especially encouraged to apply.

For more information, contact the staff of NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access at 202-606-8570 and preservation@neh.gov.

Elizabeth Joffrion Senior Program Officer Division of Preservation and Access National Endowment for the Humanities 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, DC 20506 202-606-8570 (fax) 202-606-8639

Forwarded to us from Judith Wright:

—–Original Message—–

Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2010 11:22 AM

To: DLF-ANNOUNCE@LISTS.CLIR.ORG

Subject: University of Washington Libraries joins Flickr Commons

UW Libraries participates in Flickr Commons

theme of inaugural collection: “Winter Sports”


University Libraries Special Collections and Digital Initiatives announce the launch of a partnership with Flickr online image resource and management service, beginning February 10 th with a collection of images from the Libraries on the theme of “Winter Sports in the Northwest.” To view the collection, see http://www.flickr.com/photos/uw_digital_images/


Additions from the Libraries collections to the flickr commons pool are planned for the second Wednesday of each month.


The UW Libraries is only the second university library to contribute images — the first one was Oregon State. Participating institutions include New York Public Library, Smithsonian Institution, U.S. National Archives, Swedish National Heritage Board, Bibliothèque de Toulouse. See other participating institutions.

The program has two main objectives, to increase access to publicly-held photography collections, and to provide a way for the general public to contribute information and knowledge


Under “The Commons,” cultural institutions that have reasonably concluded that a photograph is free of copyright restrictions are invited to share such photograph under their new usage guideline called “no known copyright restrictions.”


Flickr Commons was launched on January 16 2008, when Flickr released their pilot project in partnership with The Library of Congress .

The University of Washington Libraries is a network of 17 libraries serving three campuses: Seattle, Bothell and Tacoma. Major facilities include Suzzallo and Allen Libraries, Odegaard Undergraduate Library and the Health Sciences Library, as well as subject-oriented libraries. For Libraries news, events and exhibits, visit http://www.lib.washington.edu/about/news

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Forwarded by Kent McKeever 14 Sept. 2009 (the funny characters were in the email)

Date: Mon, 14 Sep 2009 12:53:11 -0700 (PDT)

From: Amy Kohrman <akohrman@stanford.edu>

Dear LOCKSS Alliance participant,

CLOCKSS and CrossRef have implemented the means to track articles from discontinued journals using the CrossRef DOIs (Digital Object Identifiers) originally assigned to the articles. When a published journal or other content is no longer available from a publisher, an archive that stores that content experiences a “trigger event.”  CLOCKSS experienced its first triggered events with the SAGE Publication journals Auto/Biography and Graft and Oxford University Press' Brief Treatment and Crisis Intervention.  These events led to the discovery that CrossRef would need to accommodate multiple DOI resolutions, as the affected titles were stored in multiple archives.  All three titles are now available for free at http://www.clockss.org/clockss/Triggered_Content.

“Two important tenets of CrossRef’s mission are persistence and cooperation,” said Ed Pentz, Executive Director of CrossRef. “Making sure that the CrossRef DOIs that have been assigned to content that has moved from a publisher journal platform to an archive still resolve to the articles is an important part of that persistence. Persistence is not only achieved through technology but by cooperation: CrossRef, publishers, journal hosting services, and the archiving organizations have all worked together to ensure continued access to the scholarly record. These journals are particularly strong examples of the system in action as there are multiple archives available to guarantee ongoing access.”

“The CLOCKSS Archive, the community-governed archiving initiative with broad support from publishers large and small, CrossRef, and the library community, has made all three journals openly available from two geographically separate sites,” notes Gordon Tibbitts, Co-Chair CLOCKSS Board of Directors. CLOCKSS truly serves the world's scholars by ensuring content no longer available from any publisher is available to everyone for free.”

Learn more about why your organization should participate in CLOCKSS at http://www.clockss.org/clockss/Benefits. Please consider joining CLOCKSS today.  And thanks, as always, for your support!

Best wishes, Amy

Amy Kohrman Marketing Director LOCKSS/CLOCKSS 1450 Page Mill Road Palo Alto, CA  94304 akohrman@stanford.edu

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